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More From Camera Club #2

Today will be the three selected specific to the theme, "Nature".


Morning On Milford Sound

Two alternate titles for this piece, which I usually do much closer to a square crop (or, actually, full-frame). Because there is a boat along one edge, I've cropped in on that side for this 'show' theme. Still works well, and I will perhaps move to the current crop for any future printing/display. Time of day for the photo is ten-ish. I'm recalling that our tour boat served lunch, so departed close to that time, however without digging through old notes won't specify that. More idle thoughts related later in the post.


Ferns, Hagley Park Botanical Garden

I put this one in both for the irony and the location. Irony, because there is nothing in this photo showing Man yet the location, Hagley Park Botanical Garden is in the heart of Christchurch and in fact not far from downtown. Location I would hope just now to be obvious; Christchurch, Chch, where the people are still experiencing aftershocks to the big earthquake of a couple weeks ago, and those 'aftershocks' measuring as fairly intense earthquakes in their own right. I spent perhaps nine days in Chch, most of them sequential, and I feel a very strong affinity for the people and their place.


Chrysalis

This is right here on teh Ranch. For me, one of the fun parts in this photo is doing something that boggles the minds of a lot of current photographers. One of the big 'advantages' of digital photography is that memory cards (storage, essentially the equivalent of 'film') now are such most people may record hundreds of images before filling the card - even if they are using the highest quality largest file size settings. Anyone who shoots film knows that film comes with a finite, smaller number of images per roll. In 35mm for example, rolls come 20, 24, and 36 frames. In 120mm (my medium-format) and specifically the format my cameras shoot, 12 images per roll. Not hundreds.

I've a compact flash card which I purchased with the very first digital point-and-shoot camera I bought. The card which came with the camera was 32Mb. This card was 96Mb, significantly larger. Later I purchased even larger cards. Currently in the D70s I generally use 1Gb cards and get around 150 images. Periodically I load that 96Mb card into the D70s. I get 17 photographs. Only Seventeen.

The exercise reminds me that every image counts. Practice making them all good.

On the trip to New Zealand, and actually around that time period overall, I recorded some pertinent data about each image when I made it. Some of it could be recorded once for each roll, and specifics only per frame. Digital cameras make this much easier, as the camera will record much of this date in each picture file: Shutter speed, F-stop, Lens, Exposure Speed (ISO), if the internal camera clock is set correctly, Date/Time of exposure. While I'm quite sure that notebook is around here somewhere, I've not seen it for a long time now. So I don't have the specific time of day on these images from New Zealand any longer. Just the memory that the two photos were made during the mornings of their respective days, and not the particular hour and minute.

There is some value, betimes, in knowing that much detail. Other times, it isn't all that important.

Yesterday at Hospital was Stay Late. This one is the longest I've been hit with so far since many years back. Essentially, I worked a 'double' with eight hours extra on top of the usual eight hour shift I work. Tonight I work Nights, one of my weekend commitments. I expect I'll be taking a nap this afternoon.

Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
mujetdebois
Sep. 25th, 2010 01:52 am (UTC)
I really like the air of mystery in the 1st photograph.
madshutterbug
Sep. 25th, 2010 07:21 pm (UTC)
Thank you. There is that, isn't there. *G*
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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