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Please, Sir, May I Have Some More?

Recently the occasion came my way to read a list of traditional presents for various anniversaries. This occured at a local restaurant (which one eludes my at this time), and is mostly significant because I don't recall seeing anything for the 19th anniversary. While I know some of the great traditionals (25 = Silver, 50 = Gold), and while I never did pay much attention to the subject prior to reading this, it caught my eye on this occasion because I am rapidly approaching Herself's and my 19th With Benefit of Clergy anniversary. We've got a few more years on top of that Without Benefit of Clergy, but we're pretty informal about that anniversary.


So yesterday, after feeding and haying the Ranch Critters, and ensuring that the BorderCollie Bros enjoyed a good exercise (without, though, Mamma Mudge helping us, as she is Smelling Very Interesting), I hie'd me on down the road to the Hoggetowne Medieval Faire once again, reporting for duty to help fatfred after dropping off more beeswax for Herself to continue with dipping candles and making sale-able beeswax blocks.

Now, you might ask "What is the use of a sale-able beeswax block?" Thank you for asking, seamstress', needlepointers, and other stitchery individuals find it very helpful to not only cut down on corrosion on needles, but to help the thread pass through fabrick, particularly heavy fabric. Knifemakeres find it expeditious to the same end for hand-made knives. Carpenters like it for that purpose as well as making a really nice wax finish. But I digress.

Dropped off the beeswax and got into the Crafty Celt booth with fatfred to help out (No, Fred, not that way. Shut Up. Or I'll go get the food processor.) Temperatures dropped overnight with cloud cover clearing out, so while the ground was still muddy, it wasn't quite so soggy. And while business remained fairly steady, there were plenty enough long enough lulls that I got to do a bit of walk-about at the Faire. Being interested in objects with sharp edges and pointy tips, at least enough so to determine if what is being sold constitutes the Real Thing or just Theatrical Props, I wandered into one booth selling various and sundry blades. Backing up to take in the entire length of a reproduction two-handed Great Sword, I bumped into An Object...

Which, fortunately, I didn't knock over. When I turned around to see what I'd bumped into (and to apologize, if it turned out to be Human), I spotted a really good looking Spanish saddle. "Oh My," said I to Myself, "that looks like it should fit Stormy, and be a proper sized saddle for Herself, if not me."

Replied Myself, "I, you must check this out." So I did a finger-hand-span rough measurement of length and width, then squatted down to look at the rig (English, if anyone cares to know), found that it includes a cinch, and stood back up. When I commenced running my fingers around underneath the saddle to feel the padding and general condition, I managed to make eye contact with a lady that turned out to be the proprietess.

And she commented, "You have horses." Not a question, a comment. With a grin on her face.

"Yes, two actually."

"That's a good start," she said. I nodded. "So, will that fit?"

"It'll fit one of them; not the Quarter, but should fit the two-year-old Thoroughbred." So we nattered and chatted a bit, and compared horses and saddles, and the acquisition thereof. She enjoyed our getting Stormy via Thoroughbred Rescue. The saddle came to her as part of a trade, and there were two of them. She allowed as how since we were there as Vendors, she could cut a bit better deal than the posted price. I allowed as to how I would need to check with SWMBO, which got a big grin.

So I did, and she likes it, and I went and bought it, pristine, never been used, Excellent Condition. One person stopped me while I carried it back to the Past-Times Artisan's Guild booth, with a puzzled look, and asked me, "McClelland?" Which if you know much about horses, you might understand the mild confusion. The McClelland saddle is the saddle used by the U.S. Cavalry. It doesn't look English, but doesn't have the saddle-horn people instantly recognize as a Western saddle.

"No," I replied. "It predates that a touch; medieval Spanish. Like, Conquistador era."


And it made Herself no end of happy when I brought it in and said, "Happy Anniversary!" Now I know what the gift is for 19th Anniversaries.

Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
starcat_jewel
Feb. 6th, 2006 09:08 am (UTC)
Seed-beaders also use beeswax on their beading thread, for the same purpose that stitchers do. And people who make pysanky use it to cover an area once it's been dyed the proper color, so that further applications of dye won't take on that location.

I'm not sure whether it's the kind of wax that batikers use or not.
miz_hatbox
Feb. 6th, 2006 10:17 am (UTC)
and, when beeswax is melted with olive oil, it makes wonderful hand balm.
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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