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Interesting Night

With the clouds rolling in, the wind picked up. Nowhere near gale, but a steady wind and strong enough to kick up waves on the lake. No surfing; but regular waves. There's still a strong breaze and I hear waves lapping the shore... but currently it look's clear out. Today's forcast increases the chance of rain from yesterday's, but there appears to be less haze on the lake, and as I mentioned, it looks clear. The Internet weather does describe Wenatchee (about a half hour's drive away and a fairly good sized town/small city) as Clear.

Huh.

Meanwhile, the camera on tripod is back out on the balcony. I'm continuing the theme of time-lapse landscapes. Included in this exercise on this trip is that I put into the camera a smaller memory card, a mere 96 megabyte card. Set on the RAW image file format these equates to a 16 shot roll of film. Why limit myself? Because that very limitation causes a slowing of work. With fewer frames to expose, thinking about composition and exposure becomes more critical. It's an exercise in Photography vs. Snapshots.

Now, there are times I kick into High Volume mode. It's one of the advantages of digital over film in that sense. With memory prices down, it's not terribly expensive to buy a 1 Gb card, or even a 2 Gb card. Even equating the expense to the equivalent number of rolls of film, it's not a huge expense. When the cost of processing that same number of film rolls is included, it's a savings. Particularly since the memory is re-usable. Film isn't.

On the other hand, film is still a more consistent archival storage than digital. My fellow photographers will recognize this dillema. On previous trips, I relied on memory sticks to back-up digital photos. So, the copy on the laptop's hard drive, and the copy on the memory stick. After all, hard drives fail. This is not quite the safety factor that several photographers I know, or corrospond with, employ. So I hiked up the paranoia a notch on this trip. Copy on the laptop HD. Copy on an external 40Gb HD. Copy burned to DVD. It helps that the new laptop includes an internal burner drive.

But High Volume mode also means that there's a high probablility one will sort through that high volume of images and discard many. Not a worry when it is so relatively inexpensive to make them. Still, time consuming on the processing end. Spending that time on the production end, thinking about the photo, is one of the lessons taught in an early stage in photography classes. Might be going a bit to the wayside with the increasing use of digital, but still a very important lesson.

Think about your message. It may be a simple message, eh? "Lake Chelan Is Beautiful." But think about it and capture the best rendering of that message possible.

Light.

I love the light here, and as mentioned yesterday even when it's raining. How often one may hear the comment when someone looks at a photograph in overcast, wet, rainy conditions, "Oh, it's too bad it was a rainy day."

Why too bad? Would someone say the same thing if a painter rendered an image of "Rain On Lake Chelan"?

Yes, it is currently clear. And very cool. I can see clouds on the Other Side, so I expect they will be heading this way. I believe that forecast for rain; and depending on say the wind, I'm willing to work with it. Whatever talents I possess as a photographic artist, are gifts from the Creator. (Do please note the gender-less reference, and I'm not forcing either the belief or the Name onto you; it's my choice.) Whatever images I render are merely reprodutions of the work of the Creator. Who am I to argue with the conditions imposed on my by that teacher?

So periodically I either load up my film camera, or put in those smaller memory cards, and I work at a slower pace. Digital is much easier to travel with by air these days. I've not travelled by rail in five years or so, and that in a place which was much less paranoid than were I live now. Even the cruise ships are x-raying items brought on board, so digital plays in there as well. Film requires some attention, and knowing things about it mean travelling with it to the standards I hold is less convenient than digital. But that limitation of the number of frames, which slows down the contemplation, which heightens the planning, that's an exercise worth doing regardless of the 'format' the work is recorded on.

Comments

( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
tx_cronopio
Oct. 15th, 2006 06:00 pm (UTC)
I love photographs of rain. I love rain in general, living as I do where we have about 335 sunny days a year.
madshutterbug
Oct. 16th, 2006 01:10 am (UTC)
Then you must keep an eye out here. *G* I'd even have gotten my response to your music meme posted sooner except that, while typing, I looked up and dashed to the balcony for a photograph which could not be refused.
wedschilde
Oct. 16th, 2006 05:23 am (UTC)
i adore light. well different slants of it. :)
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )

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